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No Need to Ask... High Tech Direction Help

Boot Camp feature for Thursday, May 4, 2000

Real men don't ask people for directions. But computers? That's another story. Don't ask me to solve the great mystery about why I and others of my gender don't stop to ask for directions. But now that I have more than 6.3 million miles worth of street maps in the U.S. and Canada loaded on my laptop, it's sort of a mute question. Microsoft is out with Streets and Trips 2001. What's new in the latest version? Microsoft's Deborah Rappaport...

"We have GPS capability this year. We have the ability to install the entire product on your hard drive this year so that you don't have to swap CDs."

That's a big plus as are the hundreds of thousands of restaurants, hotels, gas stations and ATM locations listed. GPS capability means if you have a global positioning satellite receiver attached to your laptop, the program knows where you are and can tell you how to get where you are going. But unlike rival packages from TravRoute, Delorme and Etak ... you don't have the option of buying the software bundled with a GPS receiver. Streets and Trips 2001 will let you save maps to a handheld computer, but only those running Microsoft's operating system... .

"Really what you're able to do is take any piece of the map, put it into your Windows CE device and take it with you on the road."

For just 25 dollars after a rebate, Streets and Trips 2001 is a good deal. You can find us on the Web at ThirdAge.com. Bootcamp, I'm Fred Fishkin for CBS News.